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What do grooms think?

Updated: Aug 22, 2018


To comment on such a topic, it’s handy being a bloke!


Of course, the general consensus is that the wedding day is all about the bride. The wedding industry focuses on the bride’s needs and justifiably so. When walking down the aisle, attending guests will pay attention to her posture when walking, chosen dress, shoes, make up, style of hair and facial expression. All of these factors can lead to a high level of stress and expectation.


But what of the groom, he arrives supposedly, a tad earlier than the bride, well-groomed, in a chosen outfit, how is he feeling to the lead up to the big day?


The bucks turn


Maybe a month ago, his attention revolved around his buck’s turn. Assisted by his best man and tailored to the groom’s needs, on the actual date, time, location and who to invite.


Once the numbers are known, cost per head, booze supplied or BYO? Buck nights have changed dramatically over the years. No longer, standing around an old 44 gallon drum, open fire and a coldie in the hand, toasting the groom. Fast forward to present day, and in some cases a big ticketed event. Game of golf or paint ball skirmish, bus trip to the city, off to the wineries. Lunch and dinner, drinks at bar prices, don’t forget to shout the groom. Under strict instructions from his fiancé, "to behave". The day comes and goes without incident, (well hopefully), what a relief!


Reception details and the bridal waltz


The countdown to the big day, is on in earnest. Negotiating what the bride and groom want on their wedding day, can be challenging. Who to invite, who sits with who, type of venue, band or DJ. I know of some grooms who agree to dance lessons, for the all important bridal waltz. Brave call for the man with two left feet, often winning brownie points with his bride. Love is about give and take, of course, but please, do not step on her toes.Attending the wedding rehearsal, normally one or two weeks prior to the wedding date and the sudden realisation, he is soon to be married and no longer single.


Getting ready for the day


Morning of the big day finally comes around. Having his best man and groomsmen by his side, instills much needed confidence and moral support. Wishing and hoping that the ceremony and reception will be a success. I hope I don’t stuff up my vows. Hope the beer is nice and cold at the reception. Putting on his wedding attire, having troubles with his tie, and the lapel flower is crooked, "can anyone please help"? All the groomsmen are clueless, will have to wait for female know-how. A glance in the bathroom mirror, and he thinks to himself, it’s a heck of a lot easier for a bloke to get ready than a female, took 15 minutes tops, and that’s with a shower.


He arrives at the ceremony 20 minutes prior to the start time, and the nerves are settling in. "Where are the toilets?" At this stage, the role of the best man and groomsmen is pivotal. When the wait is on in earnest, keeping the groom engaged in conversation has a calming influence.


Start time is say, 4PM and at 4:15PM the celebrant is informed that the bridal car is close by. Anticipation is at fever pitch.


The moment he meets her


Time stands still, the moment has arrived, the groom takes a deep breath, the music plays, he starts to smile as he sees his gorgeous fiancé walking ever so slowly down the aisle. She greets him arm in arm with her dad, or whoever may have the honour. She greets him with the touch of her hand, eye contact is made, let the ceremony begin. Thank God for that, the wait was killing him!


Being close to the action, I can often here the groom say to his bride, "You are beautiful". Nerves are gone, anxiety gone, he is ready, and he could not be happier. Bring it on.


Let me know your wedding date as I'd love to be your celebrant!

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